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BOLIVIANAS
27 January 2010
Chulumani, Bolivia
A worker rests on a mound of coca leaves in central Bolivia, the president’s power base. President Morales stresses that the plant is intrinsic to local culture, not just the raw material for cocaine. Bolivia is home to some 36 indigenous groups, who, although a majority in the population, have suffered marginalization and discrimination since colonial times. The country’s president, Evo Morales, the first indigenous Bolivian to hold that office, is leader of the Movement towards Socialism party, whose long-held goal has been the integration of indigenous communities into national life. President Morales enjoys considerable popularity. In 2009, he was elected for a second term in office with 64 percent of the vote.
Photo by Pietro Paolini

BOLIVIANAS

27 January 2010

Chulumani, Bolivia

A worker rests on a mound of coca leaves in central Bolivia, the president’s power base. President Morales stresses that the plant is intrinsic to local culture, not just the raw material for cocaine. Bolivia is home to some 36 indigenous groups, who, although a majority in the population, have suffered marginalization and discrimination since colonial times. The country’s president, Evo Morales, the first indigenous Bolivian to hold that office, is leader of the Movement towards Socialism party, whose long-held goal has been the integration of indigenous communities into national life. President Morales enjoys considerable popularity. In 2009, he was elected for a second term in office with 64 percent of the vote.

Photo by Pietro Paolini

If everything in my material world is in order, I will be able to get through it. My inner world is related to my outer world. If my house is a wreck, I’m a wreck. If I am together, that’s together. That’s a kind of balance.
Tom Ford
I’m so getting this carpet!

I’m so getting this carpet!

(Source: sweetcribs)

bpempire:

Breaking Bad

(Source: myprettyuniverse, via nomadiq)

my kind of place

nevver:

Couple restores abandoned French Chateau, starts a blog

(Source: chateaugudanes.com)

(Source: soulgraphy)

(Source: senior-crown, via 747dreams)

CINEMA MON AMOUR | SALVATI MARELE ECRAN

Madonna - I’m Addicted (MDNA-2012)

(Source: vimeo.com)

What Happens When You Blow Soap Bubbles at -9°C?

Original story by Bored Panda.

Photography by Angela Kelly.

Water is acceptance of the unknown, of demons, of emotions, of letting go and allowing yourself to flow freely with it
Nicholas Mevoli
DINOTRACKS OF BOLIVIA
It would appear from this photograph that 68 million years ago, dinosaurs found themselves up against the wall. In 1994, in the course of excavation of a limestone quarry at Cal Orko near Sucre, Bolivia, this rock wall was exposed, and on it… more dinosaur tracks than found anywhere else in the world. Possibly more dinosaur tracks than found everywhere in the world all together!The main rock surface is a layering plane of limestone that is 1.2km in length, 80m high, and dipping a steep 70degrees into the quarry. At last count, more than 5,000 tracks from 462 individual dinosaurs were exposed representing six different species. Among them, one trail was made by a baby Tyrannosaurus Rex: this particular individual was given the nickname of Johnny Walker. Johnny kept on walking leaving his tracks over a 367m long path. The original environment visited by Johnny and his friends was apparently a shallow lake. They left their footprints in soft, moist, limey mud which then dried. The prints were then filled with new muddy sediments during the next wet cycle, which then dried again, and then were filled with wet mud again, which dried again… and again… and again forming a thick series of limestones and keeping the tracks in a state of excellent preservation. In later time, after the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction, the rocks were rotated to their present steep position by the push and shove movement of tectonic plates. Ankylosaurs, titanosaurs, igaunodaunts, T-Rex! So many animals, so many footprints that paleontologists refer to the site as a “dinosaur dance floor.”Well, at least it appears they were having a good time before their extinction ~65 million years ago…Annie RThis photo is by Ramon Kristian Arellano (via flickr)Collection of dinotracks from this locality can be viewed at:
http://www.kuriositas.com/2013/09/the-incredible-dinosaur-wall-of-bolivia.htmlhttp://www.altering-perspectives.com/2013/06/cliff-wall-in-bolivia-covered-in.html
And information from:http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2011/jul/15/dinosaur-tracking-bolivia-cal-orkohttp://www.atlasobscura.com/places/dinosaur-dance-floor

DINOTRACKS OF BOLIVIA

It would appear from this photograph that 68 million years ago, dinosaurs found themselves up against the wall. 

In 1994, in the course of excavation of a limestone quarry at Cal Orko near Sucre, Bolivia, this rock wall was exposed, and on it… more dinosaur tracks than found anywhere else in the world. Possibly more dinosaur tracks than found everywhere in the world all together!

The main rock surface is a layering plane of limestone that is 1.2km in length, 80m high, and dipping a steep 70degrees into the quarry. At last count, more than 5,000 tracks from 462 individual dinosaurs were exposed representing six different species. Among them, one trail was made by a baby Tyrannosaurus Rex: this particular individual was given the nickname of Johnny Walker. Johnny kept on walking leaving his tracks over a 367m long path. 

The original environment visited by Johnny and his friends was apparently a shallow lake. They left their footprints in soft, moist, limey mud which then dried. The prints were then filled with new muddy sediments during the next wet cycle, which then dried again, and then were filled with wet mud again, which dried again… and again… and again forming a thick series of limestones and keeping the tracks in a state of excellent preservation. In later time, after the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction, the rocks were rotated to their present steep position by the push and shove movement of tectonic plates. 

Ankylosaurs, titanosaurs, igaunodaunts, T-Rex! So many animals, so many footprints that paleontologists refer to the site as a “dinosaur dance floor.”

Well, at least it appears they were having a good time before their extinction ~65 million years ago…

Annie R

This photo is by Ramon Kristian Arellano (via flickr)

Collection of dinotracks from this locality can be viewed at:

http://www.kuriositas.com/2013/09/the-incredible-dinosaur-wall-of-bolivia.html
http://www.altering-perspectives.com/2013/06/cliff-wall-in-bolivia-covered-in.html


And information from:
http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2011/jul/15/dinosaur-tracking-bolivia-cal-orko
http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/dinosaur-dance-floor

summer memories

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Høyvika Beach on Andøya, Vesterålen in Northern Norway by  Stian Klo

Høyvika Beach on Andøya, Vesterålen in Northern Norway by  Stian Klo